Subscribe free to our newsletters via your
  GPS News  


Subscribe free to our newsletters via your




















GPS NEWS
Thermal Vacuum Test Validates Lockheed Martin's GPS III Satellite Design
by Staff Writers
Denver CO (SPX) Feb 04, 2016


With eight satellites under contract, the production line is now on a steady tempo at Lockheed Martin's GPS III Processing Facility outside of Denver. The first four GPS III satellites are in various stages of assembly and test with most major components - including their structure and propulsion systems, solar arrays, and antennas - already delivered. This spring, with Harris Corporation's delivery of its second navigation payload, the second GPS III satellite is expected to be integrated and begin environmental testing.

Engineers at Lockheed Martin recently proved their design for the world's most powerful Global Positioning System (GPS) satellite can operate in and withstand the harsh conditions it will experience on orbit.

On December 23, Lockheed Martin's first GPS III satellite for the U.S. Air Force completed system-level Thermal Vacuum (TVAC) testing, validating the design of the entire assembled satellite. TVAC is a rigorous test designed to prove a satellite's integrity and operational capabilities by subjecting it to prolonged cycles of simulated space temperature extremes in a special depressurized chamber.

"TVAC is the most comprehensive and perceptive test performed at the spacecraft level. If there is an issue with your design or production processes, you are going to find it here," said Mark Stewart, vice president of Lockheed Martin's Navigation Systems mission area.

"Successful completion of this significant test validates the thermal design of the spacecraft and verifies that all spacecraft components and interfaces operate at the temperature extremes of the space environment. We credit this performance to the Back to Basics work we performed earlier and the program's unique GPS III Non-flight Satellite Testbed."

TVAC is the latest in a string of milestones for the first GPS III satellite. Last spring, the satellite's major functional components were successfully integrated to form the first complete satellite. Last fall, the new satellite also successfully completed acoustic testing, where it was pounded with sound waves to simulate the vibrations it will endure during its launch.

With eight satellites under contract, the production line is now on a steady tempo at Lockheed Martin's GPS III Processing Facility outside of Denver. The first four GPS III satellites are in various stages of assembly and test with most major components - including their structure and propulsion systems, solar arrays, and antennas - already delivered. This spring, with Harris Corporation's delivery of its second navigation payload, the second GPS III satellite is expected to be integrated and begin environmental testing.

Components for the next four GPS III satellites are already being assembled, tested and delivered on schedule by more than 250 aerospace industry companies from 29 states.

"We have a world class industry team supporting the development and production of GPS III for the Air Force and our nation," continued Stewart. "I thank them for their excellent work and commitment to this program."

GPS III will deliver three times better accuracy, provide up to eight times improved anti-jamming capabilities and extend spacecraft life to 15 years, 25 percent longer than the satellites launching today. GPS III's new L1C civil signal also will make it the first GPS satellite to be interoperable with other international global navigation satellite systems.

The GPS III team is led by the Global Positioning Systems Directorate at the U.S. Air Force Space and Missile Systems Center. Air Force Space Command's 2nd Space Operations Squadron (2SOPS), based at Schriever Air Force Base, Colorado, manages and operates the GPS constellation for both civil and military users.

.


Related Links
GPS at Lockheed Martin
GPS Applications, Technology and Suppliers






Comment on this article via your Facebook, Yahoo, AOL, Hotmail login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle

Previous Report
GPS NEWS
Galileo signals covering more of the sky
Paris (ESA) Feb 03, 2016
Europe's ninth and tenth Galileo satellites have started broadcasting working navigation messages. These two satellites were launched together on 11 September last year. Once safely in orbit and their systems activated, their navigation payloads and search and rescue transponders were subjected to a rigorous process of in-orbit testing, to ensure their performance reached the necessary specifica ... read more


GPS NEWS
Transgenic plants' 'die and let live' strategy dramatically increases drought resistance

China jails employees of US food firm over meat scandal

How 'more food per field' could help save our wild spaces

Improved harvest for small farms thanks to naturally cloned crops

GPS NEWS
A step towards keeping up with Moore's Law

Scientists build a neural network using plastic memristors

Switchable material could enable new memory chips

Molecular-like photochemistry from semiconductor nanocrystals

GPS NEWS
Thales helicopter simulator receives Level D qualification in Norway

Japan unveils first stealth fighter jet

U.K. Ministry of Defense contracts for flight training

Egypt takes delivery of Rafale fighters

GPS NEWS
Renault opens first China factory

Dutch test first self-drive minibuses

Bumpy road ahead for electric cars: Tesla boss

Germany approves scandal-hit VW's recall plan for 2.0-litre cars

GPS NEWS
Russian tourism in Turkey crumbles after plane downing

Fincantieri signs framework accords with Iranian companies

Japan's 2015 trade deficit narrows as oil prices tumble

Kerry in Laos to discuss bomb legacy and ASEAN partnership

GPS NEWS
Study documents drought's impact on redwood forest ferns

Canada protects ancient Pacific coast forest from logging, hunting

Landscape pattern analysis reveals global loss of interior forest

Over-hunting threatens Amazonian forest carbon stocks

GPS NEWS
JPL researchers report on new tool to provide even better Landsat images

NASA Radar Brings a New View of World Heritage Site

DigitalGlobe Receives Early Commitments for WorldView-4 Satellite Capacity

Russia to launch Resurs-P satellite on March 12

GPS NEWS
Nano-coating makes coaxial cables lighter

Novel nanotechnology technique makes table-top production of flat optics a reality

Nanosheet growth technique could revolutionize nanomaterial production

New record in nanoelectronics at ultralow temperatures




Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News








The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2016 - Space Media Network. All websites are published in Australia and are solely subject to Australian law and governed by Fair Use principals for news reporting and research purposes. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA news reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement, agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement All images and articles appearing on Space Media Network have been edited or digitally altered in some way. Any requests to remove copyright material will be acted upon in a timely and appropriate manner. Any attempt to extort money from Space Media Network will be ignored and reported to Australian Law Enforcement Agencies as a potential case of financial fraud involving the use of a telephonic carriage device or postal service.